The Australian Government requires people to opt in to keep the insurance cover they have through their inactive super accounts. Your account will be defined as ‘inactive’ if no contribution or rollover has been received for a continuous period of 16 months.

This means that members with accounts that have been inactive for 16 months, and have not opted in, will have their insurance cancelled.

The change is part of the Australian Government’s Protecting Your Superannuation legislation. It’s designed to preserve the super balances of members with inactive accounts for longer by stopping the insurance premiums they pay for cover they may not need.

I want to keep my insurance

To maintain your insurance, complete the following form to let us know you would like to keep your insurance.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • What kind of insurance could I have through Qantas Super?

    Income protection: can provide you with a monthly income if you become ill or injured and are temporarily unable to work.

    Total and permanent disablement (TPD) cover: can provide you with a lump sum payout to help out if you become totally and permanently disabled and can no longer work.

    Death cover: can provide your dependants with a lump sum payout if you pass away. This is also known as life insurance or “life cover”. If you are diagnosed with a terminal condition, you may be able to receive an advance payment of your death benefit as a terminal illness benefit.

  • Do I need insurance?

    Do you need the insurance you have in your account? Here are some things to think about before it is automatically switched off:

    • If you passed away, what debts would be left behind for your loved ones to pay? Death cover can be used to help pay off debts or look after financial dependants so they aren’t left financially vulnerable.
    • What would your financial needs be if you were unable to work due to disability? Income protection and TPD cover can help you afford extra expenses, like in-house care and mobility equipment, and provide extra money to live on.
    • Do you have insurance in another super fund? If you do, work out which combination of superannuation and insurance cover best suits your needs.
  • What type and how much insurance cover do I have?

    The letter we sent you advises you of your cover details. Alternatively, you can log into your account to see the details or view your most recent statement.

  • How much are my insurance premiums?

    The letter we sent you includes information about your monthly insurance premiums. You can also find information about your insurance premiums by logging into your account or viewing your most recent statement.

  • How do I know how much insurance cover I need?

    To determine what level and type of insurance is right for you, you should consider your personal circumstances, including:

    • what your specific needs are for financial security and peace of mind
    • whether you have any dependants or debts, like a mortgage
    • whether you may be able to get insurance cover again in the future – this may be difficult depending on your age, occupation and health circumstances
    • the cost of your insurance cover and what your account balance is with Qantas Super
    • whether your superannuation can be consolidated into one account to minimise costs

    If you need help to figure out what kind of insurance cover you might need, you can get simple advice over the phone or face to face. It’s included as a part of your membership so there’s no extra cost.

    The insurance needs calculator, provided by the Association of Superannuation Funds of Australia, can also give you a general picture of whether you have enough insurance cover for death, disablement, and income protection.

  • I've just made a change to my insurance cover - do I still need to opt in?

    Yes. The Protecting Your Superannuation legislation changes are for anyone who has had an inactive account for more than 16 months. So even if you have actively changed your insurance cover, you still need to opt in or make a contribution to your super if you want your cover to continue.

  • I've taken out extra voluntary insurance cover through Qantas Super - do I still need to opt in?

    Yes. The Protecting Your Superannuation legislation changes are for anyone who’s had an inactive account for more than 16 months. So even if you have taken out extra voluntary insurance cover through Qantas Super, you still need to opt in or make a contribution to your super if you want your cover to continue.

  • What happens if I have an existing claim?

    You are currently covered by insurance provided through Qantas Super. This means that if you have already made a claim on your insurance and are waiting on an outcome, any potential payment will not be affected by this change.

    However, you will not be covered if your account has been inactive for 16 months and you do not opt in to keep your insurance. This means you cannot claim if you become ill or injured after your cover cancellation date.

  • What happens if I opt in?

    Your cover will continue, and we will continue to deduct premiums to pay for that cover. After you opt in, we’ll contact you at least every 15 months to remind you:

    • that you chose to stay covered
    • to review your financial situation and your cover, to make sure your cover is still right for you.
  • What happens if I make a contribution to my account?

    If you make a contribution to your account before your cancellation date, your cover will continue – and your account will no longer be considered inactive.

    In future, if you stop making contributions to your super account for nine months, we’ll write to ask you to opt in or make a contribution if you want to stay covered. We’ll also send you reminders after your account has been inactive for 12 and 15 months.

    If you don’t opt in or make a contribution within 16 months, your insurance cover will end.

  • What if my account becomes inactive in the future?

    In future, if you stop making contributions to your super account for nine months, we’ll write to ask you to opt in or make a contribution if you want to stay covered. We’ll also send you reminders after your account has been inactive for 12 and 15 months.

    If you don’t opt in or make a contribution within 16 months, your insurance cover will end.

  • What can I do to make sure I don't lose my insurance cover in the future?

    Once you’ve opted in to keep your insurance, you should make sure there is enough in you account to cover the premiums.

  • What happens if I do nothing?

    If we don’t receive your decision to opt-in or a contribution to your account before your cancellation date, your Qantas Super insurance will be cancelled and the premiums you pay for the insurance will stop.

  • Can I re-apply for insurance cover after it ends?

    If you re-apply for insurance cover within 60 days of it being cancelled it will be automatically reinstated, as long as you’re ‘At Work’.

    ‘At Work’ means you’re at work for your normal daily hours of work, without any restrictions, when you re-apply for cover. You’re still considered ‘At Work’ if you re-apply for cover on a public holiday, weekend day, or a day of leave (other than leave taken due to illness or injury).

    However, if you’re not At Work, then Limited Cover applies until you return to being At Work for 30 consecutive days.

    Limited Cover means you’re only covered for an illness which became apparent, or an injury which first occurred, on or after the date cover recommenced. Your cover will be backdated to the date when it was first cancelled, and premiums deducted from your account for this period.

  • Will you contact me again if I am at risk of losing my insurance cover in the future?

    In future, if you stop making contributions to your super account for nine months, we’ll write to ask you to opt in or make a contribution if you want to stay covered. We’ll also send you reminders after your account has been inactive for 12 and 15 months.

    If you don’t opt in or make a contribution within 16 months, your insurance cover will end.

  • What happens if I’m on leave without pay?

    If no contributions are made to your account because you’re on leave without pay, your insurance cover will be cancelled unless you opt in. However, once you come back to work and Qantas Group contributions are made into your account, your insurance will re-start from this date and premiums will again be deducted from your account, as long as you’re ‘At Work’.

    ‘At Work’ means you’re at work for your normal daily hours of work, without any restrictions, when you re-apply for cover. You’re still considered ‘At Work’ if you re-apply for cover on a public holiday, weekend day, or a day of leave (other than leave taken due to illness or injury).

    However, if you’re not At Work, then Limited Cover applies until you return to being At Work for 30 consecutive days. Limited Cover means you’re only covered for an illness which became apparent, or an injury which first occurred, on or after the date cover recommenced. Your cover will be backdated to the date when it was first cancelled, and premiums deducted from your account for this period.

Case studies

These case studies are based on real-life scenarios and show the difference that insurance could make.

Death cover

Steven (30) and Liana (29) were the proud parents of twin baby girls, when Steven was tragically killed in a car accident returning from work. Steven did not have any death cover.

Liana worked part time while the girls stayed with her parents, but her income was insufficient to cover their mortgage and living costs. This meant she had to sell the family home in a depressed market, getting less for it than what they paid – and leaving her with a substantial debt to pay off.

With death cover, Liana would potentially have been able to pay off the mortgage or reduce it to a level she could pay off on one income – giving her and the girls long term financial security.

Total and Permanent Disablement (TPD) cover

Daniel was 24 and living life to the full, when he had a serious surfing accident that left him totally and permanently disabled. He didn’t have any TPD insurance.

Daniel’s parents, Ron and Sarah, had paid off the family home and were looking forward to a financially secure retirement. After Daniel’s accident, however, they had to take on new debt and refinance their home to help pay for Daniel’s rehabilitation and ongoing care costs, and to adapt their home for wheelchair access.

With TPD cover, Daniel would potentially have received a lump sum payment to contribute to the costs of his care, providing him with greater financial independence. The lump sum payment could have also helped replace the income and superannuation he would have otherwise earned – providing valuable funds to live on into the future.

Income Protection cover

Louise was 32, single and enjoying her career as an architect when she fractured her knee falling down the steps of her apartment building, which left her unable to work for 6 months.

Her insurance through her employer’s superannuation included income protection cover, which paid a benefit for up to two years. This meant Louise received monthly benefits of 75% of her income for the time she was off work – helping cover her essential living costs during this time.

Without income protection, Louise would have had to give up her city apartment and move back in with her parents. She may also have had to go into debt to fund her other living costs. But with the protection of a regular income protection benefit, Louise could maintain her financial independence – and stay focused on her own recovery.

We're here to help

If want to learn more or need help with making a decision about your insurance, you can get simple advice over the phone or face to face. It’s included as a part of your membership so there’s no extra cost.