Your super is more than just a pot of money for when you finish work. It also has the ability to create security for those you leave behind after you die, providing it goes to the right people. These people are your beneficiaries and it’s important to let us know who they are, in case the worst happens.

There’s a common misconception you can leave your super to anyone but, legally, your super is designed to be passed to your dependants. A dependant could be your spouse, children, financial dependant, or interdependant.

If you die without nominating a beneficiary, Qantas Super will distribute your money between your dependants and/or your estate, via your legal personal representative. Leaving clear instructions about who gets your super is one of the most important things to do and the good news is that it can be done at any time.

What type of nomination can I make?

The type of nomination you can make depends on what kind of account you have.

Binding - lump sum

For super and income accounts

You tell us the names of your chosen recipients and we are legally obligated to carry out your wishes. This type of nomination protects your loved ones, as it can help ensure the people you’ve nominated get your superannuation.

This option also makes life easier for those you leave behind – from a faster, simpler claims process, to avoiding messy family arguments and potential legal battles.

Your binding nomination needs to be updated every three years and we will send you a reminder when it’s time to renew.

If you want to leave your super to non-dependants like your parents, siblings, friends, relatives, or an organisation, it’s best to nominate a legal representative in a binding nomination. That gives them the ability to distribute you super according to your wishes.

You can make a binding nomination by filling out the form below.

Binding - reversionary

For income accounts only

A reversionary nomination is also legally binding, but instead of your beneficiary receiving a lump sum in the event of your death they will receive your regular income payments from your income account.

With a reversionary nomination, you can only nominate one person, and they must be either a:

  • spouse: includes married, de facto, and same sex
  • child who is dependent on you:
    • under the age of 18;
    • financially dependent and under the age of 25; or
    • qualify because of a disability

You can make a reversionary nomination by filling out the form below.

Non-binding

For super and income accounts

A non-binding nomination gives us a guide to who you’d like to receive your super, but it’s not legally binding. ­Qantas Super will take into account your nomination, and your personal circumstances, to make the final decision on how your super is distributed.

The advantage of a non-binding nomination is that Qantas Super will consider your situation if your circumstances have changed since you made your nomination.

You can make a non-binding nomination by logging into your account.

This is a case study based on claims Qantas Super has dealt with.

Who can I nominate?

Legally, your super can only be left to your dependants, or your estate via your personal legal representative.

There are four valid types of dependants:

Spouse

Includes married, de facto, and same sex.

Children

Includes biological, step, adopted, ex-nuptial, or your spouse’s children. Payments to adult children may be subject to tax.

Financial dependant

A person wholly or partially financially dependent on you.

Interdependant

A person who you live with in a close personal relationship where one or both provide financial support and domestic support, or personal care. Other circumstances may apply.

Legal personal representative

If you wish to leave your super to a non-dependant, such as a parent, sibling, friend, or organisation, you can put it in your will and then nominate your legal personal representative (the legal executor of your will, or the person responsible for your estate).

Make a binding nomination

You can begin your binding nomination online using this step by step form. At the end you'll have the option to print your form or have it mailed to you with a return envelope. Because binding nominations are legally binding, you and two witnesses will need to sign the form before you return it to us.

What type of account do you have?

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Who can I nominate?

You can only nominate one person and they must be either your spouse or a child who is dependent on you.

Spouse

Includes married, de facto, and same sex

Child

If you nominate a child they must be:

• Under the age of 18; or
• financially dependant and under the age of 25; or
• qualify because of a disability.
We're here to help

If you are unsure whether your nomination is valid or need help completing this form please call us

1300 362 969

Who can I nominate?

Your super can only be left to dependants or your legal personal representative.

Dependants

Spouse

Includes married, de facto, and same sex

Children

Includes biological, step, adopted, ex-nuptial or your spouse's children. Payments to adult children may be subject to tax.

Financial dependant

A person wholly or partially financially dependent on you

Interdependant

A person you live with in a close personal relationship where one or both provide financial support and domestic support or personal care. Other circumstances may apply.

Legal personal representative

The legal executor of your will or the person responsible for your estate. Nominate your legal representative if you wish to leave your super to a non-dependant

We're here to help

If you are unsure whether your nomination is valid or need help completing this form please call us

1300 362 969

Nominate

Please nominate who you want your super benefits paid to in the event of your death.

Nominate

You can nominate one or more dependants and/or your legal personal representative(s).

1

+ Add another beneficiary

2

All nominations must add up to TOTAL 100%

Confirm your nomination

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Once you download and print your form, you’ll need to sign it on the same day as two witnesses and then send it back to us. If you get stuck, please call us.

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The importance of keeping your nominations up to date

Case Study: Effie's sons were left out in the cold

Protecting your loved ones and your legacy by leaving a binding nomination is easy and can prevent unfortunate and distressing issues within your family when the worst happens. Here’s the story of one family whose lengthy legal battle could have been avoided.

Filling out paperwork is painful but not nearly as painful as the three-year legal battle that erupted when Qantas Super member Effie died without confirming who was going to receive her benefits in the event of her death.

Effie was married in her 20s and had two sons. During her marriage she nominated her husband and sons as her binding beneficiaries. Clear, cut and dried, right?

Wrong. Later in life, Effie divorced and remarried. As her previous binding nomination agreement had lapsed, which it does every three years unless you renew, she died without leaving legal confirmation of who she wanted to receive her super.

After her death, Qantas Super reviewed her circumstances and her current husband was deemed the eligible recipient.  Why?  As her earlier nomination was made so long ago and her family situation had changed so much since then, Qantas Super did not give it much weight.  In situations where the deceased’s wishes are not known close to the time of death, it is common practice to award a spouse or financial dependant priority over anyone who is not financially dependent on the deceased.  Effie’s sons from her first marriage were adults, not living with her, and not financially dependent on her.

Understandably, her sons were unhappy with the outcome and mounted an exhaustive battle through the Australian Financial Complaints Authority. Unfortunately, they lost.

By not updating her details to legally name her beneficiaries in a binding nomination, Effie’s sons’ distress at losing their mother was compounded by the angst and cost of a legal case, and ultimately not receiving the legacy she had intended for them.

It’s simple to avoid these situations by clearly indicating who you want to receive your super through a binding nomination that is kept up to date, as it means we are legally bound to follow your wishes.

Simply download the form, and make sure you and your witnesses sign it on the same day. Then mail it to Qantas Super and ensure protection for your loved ones, emotionally and financially.

Effie’s story is a case study based on claims Qantas Super has assessed.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • What is the difference between a binding and non-binding nomination?

    A binding nomination means when you die Qantas Super is legally bound to pay your super to anyone you have listed as a valid dependant.

    A non-binding nomination gives us a guide to who you’d like to receive your super, but it’s not legally binding. ­Qantas Super will make the final decision on how your super is distributed.

  • What happens if I don’t make a binding nomination?

    If you die without a valid binding nomination in place, Qantas Super will distribute the money to your dependants or legal personal representative. Dependants are given priority and we will only transfer funds to your estate if there is no other option.

  • What happens to my super if I have no dependents?

    If you have no dependants we will pay to your estate. You can also nominate your estate or legal personal representative to distribute your super on your behalf.

  • Who can I name as a beneficiary?

    Superannuation is generally intended to go to your dependants. These may include:

    • Spouse or defacto partner (including same sex)
    • Biological, step or adopted children of any age
    • Anyone in an interdependent relationship with you such as someone you have a close personal relationship with, live with and one or both of you provide financial and domestic or emotional support, or personal care
    • Anyone who depends on you financially – if you pay your mother’s rent, for example.
  • Where does my super go if I don't nominate anyone?

    If you haven’t made a nomination, the trustee will decide how your super is distributed between your dependants and/or legal representative.

  • Can I change beneficiaries?

    Yes. You may wish to make changes due to life events such as divorce, re-partnering, death or having children. Or you can simply change you mind. You can update your binding nominations with this form. Non-binding nominations can be updated by logging into your account.

  • What do I need to do to make my wishes known to family members or beneficiaries?

    It’s a good idea to make sure your next of kin knows your member number and your super fund account details to make the claim process easier.

  • What is the claim process for binding nominations?

    Beneficiaries contact Qantas Super to lodge a claim. The beneficiary needs to provide a death certificate, marriage certificate or proof of relationship, and a form of ID for the deceased. That is enough for the benefit to be paid. The process is more complex for non-binding nominations as we need to work out all of your potential beneficiaries.

  • Can I leave my super to friends, non-dependent family members or charity?

    As we are only able to pay your benefit to your dependants or your estate, if you want to leave your super to others you’ll need to put this in your will and then make a binding nomination for your benefit to go to your estate. Your legal personal representative will then distribute the benefit in accordance with your will. Non-dependent beneficiary payments, including payments to adult children, may also be subject to tax.

  • Do I need to update my binding nominations?

    Yes. Binding nominations need to be updated every three years. You don’t need to set a reminder in your calendar; we’ll send you a note when your nominations need renewing.

Download binding nomination forms

You can start to make a binding nomination by filling out the form above, or by downloading the relevant blank form:

Make a non-binding nomination

You can make a non-binding nomination by logging into your account.

We're here to help

There may also be estate planning implications to consider when nominating your beneficiaries. If you have any questions about making a nomination, you can get face-to-face advice from a Super Adviser at no additional cost.